Over the course of three weeks in July, artist Daniel Pizarro led eight New Haven-based teen artists in the creation of the digital artwork that fills this room. Drawing inspiration from the Black Panther Party’s independently funded Community News Service, which allowed the Panthers to share news about the Party on their own terms, the curriculum invited students to explore graphic design as a tool for activism, organizing and storytelling. 
Adjusting to the health and safety risks posed by the coronavirus pandemic, the curriculum moved online - embracing the capacities of digital art and sharing content online as a means of distribution. Collectively, the students produced artwork reflective of the evolving, intersectional conversations that speak to resilience and self-determination of oppressed people throughout the world in the fight for liberation.  
Special thanks to Dyme Ellis and Rebecca Crocker for serving as mentors and creative facilitors on this project.